Living in Style 10

Towson Interior Designer Gives Us a Tour of Her Favorite Project—Her Own

W hen Lisa Chamness and her husband bought their 1920s Colonial Revival nine years ago, they didn’t plan on staying long.

“We had all intentions of flipping at our typical three to five-year mark, but we fell in love,” she explains.

An interior designer by trade, Lisa isn’t one to stay put. Her historic cottage, however, seems to offer it all—a beautiful place to call home and a never-ending list of projects.

“I am always thinking of something to change, whether it’s structural or cosmetic,” she says. “It’s in my blood!”

She has already made quite a few changes.

“The day we purchased this home was the day demolition started. We knocked down every interior wall we possibly could! We did, however, keep all of the original features in the home, never taking away its charm and history,” she says. “Creating an open space not only made the space more functional but also created that light, airy feel you get just by walking in the front door.”

Ask Lisa for interior design advice and, although she hates to sound cliché, she says, “Less is more. I like to keep walls and furnishings neutral and use pops of color with the use of pillows, window coverings and accent pieces. These are easy and less expensive to change.”

She also suggests using one unexpected element in each room. In her dining room, that’s a large table made from reclaimed wood from a North Carolina farm. Lisa says some of her favorite memories in her home have happened around that table.

“I REMEMBER WATCHING MY DAUGHTER, WHO IS NOW A FRESHMAN IN COLLEGE, DOING HER HOMEWORK AT THE FARM TABLE WHILE I WOULD MAKE DINNER, AND ENJOYING FRIENDS ON THE WEEKEND—SOMETIMES SNOWED IN FOR DAYS, TELLING STORIES AND LAUGHING,” LISA SAYS. “OUR HOUSE MAY BE SMALL, BUT IT ALWAYS SEEMS TO BE THE PLACE TO GATHER.”